Course Descriptions

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Course Descriptions 2017-04-24T16:44:25+00:00

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In Kindergarten we cover every aspect of the child’s development – emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual. Our goal is to look at the “whole” child. In Bible we learn about creation, character traits such as thankfulness and contentment and the true meaning of Christmas and Easter. Math consists of sorting and classifying, patterns, number sense, calendars, clocks, measurement and money, addition and subtraction concepts, geometry and fractions. Our spelling and phonics consists of simple CVC words, spelling our 45 sight words, letter recognition from A-Z, rhyming, and auditory discrimination. For those students ready to read, we use phonetic and leveled reading books. We also use “Word Builders” for student who are blending sounds to make words and teach reading strategies. Science includes units on the farm, harvest, pumpkins, weather, nutrition, plants, insects, magnets, zoo animals and ocean animals. Social Studies includes units on Lincoln and Washington, Being a Good Citizen, Land and Water on Earth, Traffic Signs, Jobs in the Community, Holidays, Patriotism, Me, and Safety.
In Bible we study God’s Story, including Creation, the Patriarchs and Old Testament key figures, the Ten Commandments, Jesus’ life from birth to death and His resurrection, and the Beatitudes. In Math we use the Houghton Mifflin curriculum which covers addition and subtraction concepts to 20, data and graphing, numbers and patterns to 100, money, two digit addition and subtraction, geometry, and measurement. Once concepts are introduced whole group, students can work at their own pace. In Language Arts we cover phonic skills from Orton Gillingham, including short and long vowel, R controlled vowels, and beginning and ending blends. McGraw Hill Anthology books are used for reading and vocabulary development. Reading is differentiated, so each student receives instruction and reinforcement at his/her level. Weekly home reading consists of Houghton Mifflin and Rigby leveled readers. Reading packets also supplement grammar, comprehension, spelling, vocabulary, and other language arts skills. Spelling is taken from the ACSI curriculum. Science curriculum covers living things, life cycles, animals, habitats, weather/seasons, nutrition, Earth’s land and water resources, and the rainforest. Social Studies comes from Harcourt Publishers and includes rules and laws, our changing world, people and the marketplace, geography/mapping, Pilgrims and Indians, United States history, and key American leaders/heroes.
Students will study the life of Moses through the Book of Exodus, witnessing the tribulations and victories of the Israelites as they learn to trust God.This study teaches that when God gives a command, He also provides a promise. Blessing can follow obedience as God graciously fulfills His Word. Major milestones for 2nd grade math include applying numbers sense to the four basic operations, understanding the use of money in real life situations, developing spatial reasoning in relation to geometric shapes, applying the various methods of measurement, exploring probability and using data. 2nd grade is a year of highly visible progress in reading and language arts. The major milestones in second grade reading and language arts are developing an extensive sight word vocabulary, applying more complex phonics strategies, writing competently for many purposes, using punctuation appropriately and experiencing a variety of literary genres. Second grade is also a year of exploration and discovery of the numbers in the world around us. Science covers patterns in nature, force and motion and earth and space. Social Studies consists of map skills, how basic needs are met, historical places, and types of jobs.
The third grade course description begins with Bible focusing on creation, the patriarchs, Exodus, God’s law, wilderness wandering, Promised Land, and the judges. Character traits and Bible verse memory are integrated weekly. Math focuses on place value to 100,000, rounding, counting money in equivalent amounts, telling time to the minute, addition and subtraction facts to 18, customary and metric measurement, perimeter, volume, area, multiplication with factors through 9, division with remainders, simple fraction equivalents, decimals, geometric figures, plane, solid, and congruent figures, estimation, charts, graphs and problem solving. Language Arts includes leveled readers and literature studies in folktales, fairy tales, poetry, and drama to build comprehension and vocabulary strategies. Spelling phonetic patterns, alphabetizing, synonyms, antonyms, homonyms and dictionary skills. Grammar includes focus on nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, capitalization, and punctuation. Handwriting includes cursive letter formation and connection of letters to fluently form words and sentences. Writing includes informative, opinion/persuasive, and fictional narrative writing. Social Studies includes local geography, Native Americans, explorers, pioneers, local history of Fresno, agriculture, government, citizenship, America’s symbols, and economics. Science includes geology with the sun, moon, and stars. Biology science includes plant and animal habitats, adaptations and survival. Physical science includes energy, light, and color. Health and safety includes local healthy air quality, nutrition choices,and home safety. Computer skills include Scholastic Reading Counts and Scholastic Reading Inventories. Music includes choral instructions and instrumental recorder choirs. Visual arts include experiences in various media. They become familiar with artists and their works from various parts of the world. P.E. includes development in cooperative games, motor skills, physical fitness to build muscle strength and endurance along with Christ-like sportsmanship.
In Bible students will cover units including the Bible as a Book, Samuel and King Saul’s Reign, King David and King Solomon, The Divided Kingdom, The Rulers and Prophets of Judah, The Decline and Fall of Judah, Daniel and Esther, and The Return. Math will cover place value, money, fractions and mixed numbers, long division, multiplication concepts, negative numbers, geometry and measurement, decimals and graphing. Language arts will include guided reading, literature studies, comprehension building, vocabulary, shared and independent reading. Writing will include keyword outlines, note taking, the writing process, personal narratives, summaries, research reports and quick writes. Students will learn about California History in Social studies. Units covered The Land and Early People, Early California, The Road to Statehood, Growth and Development, Progress as a State, California Today and Tomorrow. In Science, we will incorporate project-based activities revolving around life science, earth science and physical science. Units will include weathering and erosion, properties of matter, animal characteristics, magnetism, electricity, weather and climate.
The Bible curriculum is an overview of the Bible. It covers Writings in the Pentateuch, Books of History, Books of Poetry, Prophetic Writings, Gospel Writings, Luke’s Writings about the Early Church, New Testament Letters and the Book of Prophecy. The Math curriculum builds from previous concepts and covers Whole Numbers, Decimals and Integers; Addition Subtraction, Multiplication, Division; Measurement; Data, Statistics and Probability; Fractions; Decimals; Geometry and Measurement; Ratio and Percent; Integers and the Coordinate Plane. The Writing curriculum covers Response to Literature, Persuasive Writing, Fictional Narrative, Research Report, and the on-going review/teaching of grammar and conventions. The Reading curriculum includes literature studies and independent reading projects. The Science curriculum covers Plants, Circulatory and Digestive Systems, the Solar System, Atoms and Matter. The Social Science curriculum covers The First Americans, The Age of Exploration, Settling the Colonies, The American Revolution, Governing the Nation and Western Expansion.
Sixth Grade is a pivotal year in a student’s education. This is a year where responsibility and independence important. Students will work on these important traits as well as academic work. In Bible, a sixth grader will learn about the history and story of God and his people, the Israelites. This works hand in hand with Social Science. Students will have daily devotions, memory verses, worship time, and projects that discover the story of the Israelites. Mathematics builds from fifth grade concepts with an emphasis in mathematical relationships, expressions and equations, fractions, decimals, and simple statistics. Math journals, projects, and tests help the students prepare for the rigor of Junior High mathematics. In English Language Arts, a sixth grader will learn various writing styles, reading comprehension, and vocabulary development. Students will have a quarterly writing assessment, quarterly book projects, and a daily journal. Weekly spelling and vocabulary test will be given. History is all about ancient civilizations and basic archaeology. The students will learn how the Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Israelites lived and how their civilizations impacted our current world. In Science, a sixth grader will explore earth science, physical science, and ecology concepts. Together with projects, experiments, and journals, the students will learn the wonders of our physical world.
Fifth and sixth grade students will have the choice of two elective courses per semester. Electives are held after lunch 4 days per week.

Art: This class is designed to introduce elementary students to the elements of art. They will be creating art work inspired by artist such as Picasso, Pollock  and Mondrian. The students will work with a variety of mediums, colors and textures to create unique works of art.

Band: 5th and 6th Grade Band is an elective choice for fifth and sixth grade students. Students build on the foundation laid in 4th Grade Band. This group works on playing more complex rhythms, a variety of time and key signatures, dynamics, balance of sound, familiarity with other instruments, ensemble listening and more independent playing in the group. Students perform in a Spring Festival, as well as concerts here at FCS.

Choir: Elementary choir is an elective in the fifth and sixth grades. Students learn to sing in unison, then in two and three part harmony. The emphasis is correct vowel formation, proper breathing techniques, and an appreciation for choral music. Students sing in several concerts each year, and participate in two choral festivals.
Choir is a year long commitment.

Drama: Elementary drama aims to do 2 performances per year, one in the Fall and one in the spring.

Multi-Media/Keyboarding: Multi-Media/Keyboarding is an elective choice for fifth and sixth grades. Students explore different modes of digital creation using their personal devices. Basic computer skills will also be reviewed/covered.

Study Hall: Study hall is an elective course for fifth and sixth grades. It is a quiet environment where students are able to complete school work. No academic credit is received for this course.

Yearbook: Elementary yearbook is a year-long elective choice for fifth and sixth grades. Students will spend the year creating the elementary yearbook and will learn about photography, captioning, layout & design elements, and article writing.
Yearbook is a year long commitment.

This course engages students in the reading and study of the Bible, stressing the development of Christian attitudes and behavior through a textual study of the Bible. Using positive and negative examples, students learn from Scripture how to face challenges of everyday living and difficult life experiences. The student engages in a variety of creative experiences, projects, including Bible study, memorization, definitions, and descriptions.
Utilizing a Christian worldview, literary selections from various genres are read and studied, including age-appropriate novels, short stories, and poetry that reflect various times and cultures. English grammar, mechanics, and vocabulary are reviewed and enhanced, with an emphasis on Latin and Greek roots and affixes as used in modern English. Basic expository writing is introduced, with instruction given in the introduction, thesis, topic sentence, basic body paragraph, and conclusion. Independent reading is required in addition to classroom reading, with an emphasis on improved comprehension, vocabulary building, and language skills. Various alternative forms of literature are surveyed in order to increase the scope of the student’s reading options. Reference-based projects include both written and oral components.
Building on the skills learned in 7th grade English, students will utilize a Christian worldview to study age-appropriate novels, short stories, and poetry that reflect various times and cultures. English grammar, mechanics, and vocabulary are reviewed. Expository writing instruction and practice is continued, with an increase in length requirements, more complex sentence structure, and basic literary analysis. Independent reading is required in addition to classroom reading, with an emphasis on improved comprehension, vocabulary building, and language skills as begun in the previous year. Various alternative forms of literature are surveyed in order to increase the scope of the student’s reading options. Reference-based projects include both written and oral components that incorporate the grammatical and writing skills the student has learned. Speaking skills, including tone, eye contact, organization, and audience consideration, are emphasized in oral projects.
(8th grade only) Spanish 1 is intended for students who seek to attain proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish as well as to learn about the Spanish culture. By the end of this course, students have developed the ability to hold basic conversations in Spanish, including questioning and the use of phrases. Students are likewise instructed in the use of short sentences, words and phrases, and simple questions and commands in writing, as well as understanding some ideas and details when listening. Short texts are enhanced by visual clues when reading. Various topics, including family, friends, home, school, and other components of daily life are covered to increase usage and comprehension of the language.
This course can be used to fulfill a portion of the high school foreign language requirement needed for four year college acceptance.
UC Approved: Language other than English (“e”)
(Ratios and Proportional Relationships): Students will calculate unit rates, investigate relationships between quantities, and use that information to derive data.
(The Number System): Students will take basic knowledge of the four operations (adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing) and use that knowledge in real world scenarios. For example, spending and saving money, balancing a budget, planning trips/events.
(Expressions and Equations): Students will generate equations and translate them to the coordinate plane. Students will create formulas to construct a line, using slope.
(Geometry): Students will create scale drawings using scale factor. They will also investigate and study three-dimensional shapes. Students will classify angles, and use sides/angles to generate (construct) triangles.
(Statistics and Probability): Students can study populations and create generalizations based on the data. Students can compare populations and make inferences about the two. Students will investigate probability and chance events.
(Functions): Students will be expected to create and interpret linear functions. Students will use linear functions to model relationships, determine rate of change, and identify initial value. Students will sketch graphs and describe their functions, verbally.
(The Number System): Students will compare and contrast rational and irrational numbers, and locate them on the number line.
(Expressions and Equations): Students will apply properties of integer exponents, use square and cube roots, and perform operations expressed in scientific notation. Students will also solve linear equations, as well as systems of equations.
(Geometry): Students will perform single transformations, and sequenced transformations to validate and explain congruency.
(Statistics and Probability): Students will construct and interpret scatter plots. Students will identify associations in bivariate data (clustering, positive, negative, linear and nonlinear). Students will use equations to model and solve graphical data to interpret the meaning of slope and intercept in real life situations.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math A.
Physical Education teaches the importance of a continuing program of physical activity in relationship to good health and recreation. Students are exposed to skills necessary to participate in various team, individual, and group activities. Students develop qualities of leadership, attain and preserve physical health, learn personal safety, learn to make use of leisure time, gain an understanding of people, and learn how to work cooperatively with others. This is provided in a setting which encourages positive Christian characteristics and behavior.
This course introduces students to the forces acting on planet Earth. This course covers the Biblical basis for science, rocks and minerals, landforms, earthquakes, volcanoes, energy, weather, water, oceans, and solar bodies.
This course introduces students to the characteristics and functions of organisms. The course covers the biblical basis for science, cells, simple living things, the human body systems, plants, and the biosphere.
American history for 8th grade students is taught from a Christian perspective emphasizing Biblical truths. The course covers from the American Revolution through World War I integrating American geography, American ideals, culture, beliefs, and people. The curriculum begins with a look at the founding of this nation in a brief review. This is followed by an in-depth study of the Constitution: its principles, its purposes, its concepts, its reasons for success, and the seven articles and 27 amendments. Then follows a chronological study of the Presidential administrations from Washington to Wilson. Included are studies of Manifest Destiny, the Industrial Revolution, the development of plantations in the South, the causes and effects of the Civil War, the building of the West, the growth of industrialization, the corruption and reforms of the late 1800s, the emergence of the U.S. from isolationism, and America’s role in World War I.
World history for 7th grade students is taught from a Christian perspective emphasizing Biblical truths. The geography, culture, history, and religion of the areas studied is emphasized. This course covers the civilizations of the Americas, the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa focusing on societies in West, Central, and Southern Africa, and China and Japan. The rise and fall of the Roman Empire and contributions of Rome are covered. Students will also study Medieval Europe, the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Scientific Revolution.
This two semester course focuses on the development of basic skills and necessary techniques used in drawing, painting, and a variety of art and craft forms along with developing the ability to critically evaluate their own work as well as those of the great masters. A brief history of art and various artists will also be investigated. Students will draw using graphite pencils, colored pencils, charcoal, and pen and ink with an emphasis on the elements and principles of design. In addition, students will learn the techniques of watercolor and tempera painting through actual experience with projects. Furthermore, students will explore different subjects each semester, which may include paper making, mosaics, rock painting, scratch board, origami, basket weaving, sculpture, mobiles, collage, and printmaking.
Band is intended for students with previous instrumental experience interested in furthering their talents in a group setting. The class is designed as an intermediate instrumental group with the purpose of educating students through a variety of musical styles, while maintaining high standards of musicianship and musicality. Class activities emphasize the development of instrument technique, tone production, tuning, fundamentals of music theory, music history, music reading, and listening skills. Emphasis is also placed on the advancement of instrument technique, the further development of ensemble performance skills, and rehearsal and performance of intermediate level band music. During the fall semester, the band will serve as the Pep Band at home football games and also participate in several local parades, including the Veteran’s Day Parade and the Clovis Electric Light Parade. During the Spring semester, the band participates in local and national festivals. In addition, the band performs in a Christmas Concert and Spring recital here at Fresno Christian. Students will play a wide variety of music, including, but not limited to: Pep, Patriotic, Sacred, Jazz, and Classical music. The central focus of this class is to use the God granted gift of music to return praise to Him.
*This class fulfills the PE requirement
Junior High choir is a non-auditioned elective for students of all singing abilities. Choir members will learn to sing properly, with a focus on choral sound and unison voice. Students will gradually sing in multiple parts, until 4-part harmony is attained. Music notation reading, theory, music history and music appreciation are all taught while learning music from all eras and genres. Students sing in multiple concerts during the year, as well as attending choral music festivals locally and throughout the state. Special attention is paid to the changing voice, learning to sing correctly so the student can continue in choir throughout high school.
This course enables the student to develop interpretive skills. Emphasis is on the process of “becoming” and communicating both verbally and nonverbally as the students use their voices and bodies. Students learn how to train their talents, focus their attention, role play, interpret a scene, create a character, perform a scene or action improvisationally, and play for an audience, interpreting literature, plays, feelings, and actions. Participants are asked to escape from their own person and personality and enter into the thing being created. Students are required to take part in productions presented throughout the year. Some students, especially seniors and those who have taken the class previously, may work on individual and group theatrical projects. Some students chosen by the instructor focus on crew duties such as stage manager work, set design, and make-up design.
This course is designed to help percussion students further their musical skills. Students will rehearse and perform with others. They will be taught music reading skills, musicality, music terminology, music history, and music theory. Students will receive training serving in marching band techniques and small percussion ensembles. Students will learn the concepts of rhythm, texture, balance, blend, and rudiments as they develop their role as ensemble members. Percussion students will work on music to be performed with the band, as well as music to be performed independently as a percussion ensemble. During the first semester our primary focus will be on Marching. Students will participate in several local parades, including the Veteran’s Day Parade and the Clovis Electric Light Parade. During the spring semester students will focus on concert music and percussion ensembles.
*This class fulfills the PE requirement

Color Guard: The Color Guard/Winter Guard program at Fresno Christian School allows students the opportunity to learn performing concepts involved with flags, rifles, sabers and basic dance moves associated with a visual performance. In the fall, this group will work in conjunction with the Eagle Marching and perform in several parades. Color Guard students will work on basic movement and equipment skills through fundamental studies and working on repertoire for marching and winter guard shows. Color Guard students will learn basic aspects of performance observation and analysis. Color Guard students will design and choreograph their own production at least once during the school year. During the Spring semester, students will perform a choreographed show set to music as a Winter Guard. They will perform in local Guard competitions. During the spring semester, after school rehearsals will be held once a week. A 1 year commitment is required.
*This class fulfills the PE requirement

Home Economics/Life Skills: This year-long course teaches about the importance of personal and family living from a practical, biblical, problem-solving approach and teaching skills needed to function effectively within the family and a complex society. Emphasis will be given to the development of life skills related to interpersonal communication in family and other relationships, nutrition and food selection, cooking and meal planning, household and personal finances, introductory sewing and textile management, consumer awareness and strategies, party planning, household management and personal wellness.
Class limited to 15 students

JH Leadership: Students must apply and be accepted for this class. Students learn leadership skills based on Biblical principles. Students study the same curriculum that the JH Bible classes do, but also serve their classmates by planning and executing all student campus activities for the junior high. They also serve grades 7-12 by sponsoring lunch once a week.
Prerequisite: Application and teacher approval.

Study Hall: A 7-12 Grade elective that provides a regularly scheduled class period for students to work on class assignments, homework, and do research. This elective is especially helpful to students involved in extracurricular activities and/or who need extra time to complete assignments, seek help from available teachers. Opportunity is also available for accessing computer workstations, homework supplies and equipment.

JH Yearbook: This course is designed to develop students’ skills in yearbook by providing experiences in selected aspects of yearbook production. Students learn basic principles of yearbook production and develop skills that include writing copy, captions and headlines; digital photography; desktop publishing and using appropriate technology tools for media production. Students will be responsible for working as a team and accomplishing goals laid out in the first week. Students are also responsible for consistently meeting deadlines.

This course sequence engages the student in the reading and study of the Bible from Genesis to Malachi. The course sequence is designed to familiarize the student with the whole teaching of scripture and help them understand and apply key texts to their personal lives. Teachers utilize a variety of interactive resources including supplemental texts for historical and cultural information. This course is the Old Testament element in the sequence. It follows the basic outline of the Old Testament canon, emphasizing the historical development of the working of redemption in the nation of Israel as recorded in the Old Testament. It explores fulfillment themes in the narrative, the Wisdom literature, and the message of Israel’s prophets. The study of the writings and history of the Old Testament are examined in light of the unfolding of the gospel in the New Testament.
This course sequence engages the student in the reading and study of the Bible from Mathew to Revelation. The course sequence is designed to familiarize the student with the whole teaching of scripture and help them understand and apply key texts to their personal lives. Teachers utilize a variety of interactive resources including supplemental texts for historical and cultural information. This course is the first part of the New Testament element of the sequence, beginning with an overview of the first century Greco-Roman world-the basic cultural context for the New Testament era. It covers the material in the gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke and John) from the birth narratives to the beginning of the passion narratives. It also covers the passion of Christ and continues to the end of the New Testament era, including the letters and Revelation.
This course for juniors and seniors is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of a Christian worldview. Emphasis will be on a full understanding of God’s plan for humanity, from creation to the present and into eternity. Starting with the nature of both God and man, this will include a biblical view of philosophy, ethics, science, and history. Then the class will cover how God has set the pattern for all relationships, including church, family, the state, law, and community. From this base a study of alternative worldviews will examine not only the premises underlying them, but also how they conflict with Christian principles. Among these alternative worldviews to be examined are Naturalism, Deism, Nihilism, Existentialism, Communism, Judaism, Islam, Pantheism, Eastern religions, New Age philosophies, and Postmodernism. The course will conclude with an examination of biblical wisdom literature and the role of the prophets in biblical history.
This course also for juniors and seniors will alternate years with Christian Living I. It will present students with a comprehensive study of the history of the church, from its infancy under the guidance of Peter, Paul and the other apostles to where it is today. This will include the Pre- and Post-Nicene eras, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, the denominational spread, and the church today. Additional topics will include the growth and development of the missionary movements, Christian apologetics, the role of Christianity in shaping the world we live in.
Students must apply and be accepted for this class. This course helps students gain competencies relating to good Christian leadership and living a Christ-centered life. We will also focus on communicating effectively and working together on a team. Understanding our own personal faith and how Christ is our foundation is monumental to this course. We will be studying Scripture and learning how to deepen and develop our own personal walks with Christ. Through serving the student body, learning how to lead peers, and studying God’s Word, students will gain a deeper understanding of the life of Christ.
Prerequisite: Application and teacher approval.
Within the context of a Christian worldview, students will improve their reading and writing skills through the study of various genres of literature. A primary goal of the class is to develop students’ ability to write well-organized essays. During the course of their study, students will learn to interpret, analyze, and evaluate literature while they identify and understand the elements of fiction. They will strengthen their vocabulary and improve spelling, grammar, and study skills.
UC Approved: English (“b”)
Within the context of a Christian worldview, students will improve their critical thinking and literary analysis skills using short stories, essays, novels, and poetry written by a variety of non-American writers. Writing skills are stressed with an emphasis on formal written expression, such as the five-paragraph expository essay and children’s author research paper. Vocabulary and oral interpretation skills are practiced.
UC Approved: English (“b”)
Within the context of a Christian worldview, students will improve their critical thinking and literary analysis skills using novels, drama, short stories, poetry, and works of nonfiction. Advanced writing skills are explored with an emphasis on enhanced vocabulary and development of the student’s personal style and voice within the context of expository composition, persuasive argumentation, and fictional narrative.
UC Approved: English (“b”)
Within the context of a Christian worldview, students will improve their critical thinking and literary analysis skills in preparation for college/university admission. Novels, short stories, Shakespearean drama, poetry, and works of nonfiction are studied, including historical background to the works reviewed. Oral interpretation, research, and persuasive skills are honed. Students will develop a personal voice and style in their writing. Reflective and practical writing, including a complete student work portfolio is required.
UC Approved: English (“b”)
Offered every other year for 11th and 12th grade.
Advanced Placement English Language and Composition prepares the accelerated, college-bound student for the A.P. test and the ensuing opportunity to earn college credit. Within the context of a Christian worldview, students will improve their critical thinking and rhetorical analysis skills using essays, visual texts, and works of fiction. The thematic arrangement allows students to analyze readings, understand the complexity of the issue, synthesize multiple perspectives and develop their own viewpoint, providing students experience with synthesis and the critical use of sources that is expected in college courses.
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and approval.
UC Approved: English (“b”)
Offered every other year for 11th and 12th grade.
Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition prepares the accelerated, college-bound student for the A.P. test and the ensuing opportunity to earn college credit. Within the context of a Christian worldview, students will improve their critical thinking and literary analysis skills using novels, drama, poetry, and short stories. Form and style both in fiction and nonfiction will be explored and applied to further analysis of the studied works. Literary terms and themes will be reviewed. Advanced vocabulary and writing techniques are explored, including the development of a student’s personal style and voice. Teacher recommendation and approval required.
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and approval
UC Approved: English (“b”)
Spanish 1 is intended for students who seek to attain proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish as well as to learn about the Spanish culture. By the end of this course, students have developed the ability to hold basic conversations in Spanish, including questioning and the use of phrases. Students are likewise instructed in the use of short sentences, words and phrases, and simple questions and commands in writing, as well as understanding some ideas and details when listening. Short texts are enhanced by visual clues when reading. Various topics, including family, friends, home, school, and other components of daily life are covered to increase usage and comprehension of the language.
UC Approved: Language other than English (“e”)
Spanish 2 is intended for students who desire to progress in vocabulary acquisition, fluency, oral and reading comprehension, and sophistication in written and oral expression. Students will expand their ability to perform all the functions introduced in Spanish 1 while acquiring the ability to make requests, understand and express important ideas, and use and understand emotive expressions. Students use and understand expressions, polite commands, questions, and complex sentences when speaking and listening, as well as create simple written paragraphs and understand important ideas and some details in reading. Students demonstrate increasing fluency in vocabulary and competency when performing level 1 functions. They understand oral and written discourse, with few errors in comprehension when reading, and can demonstrate culturally appropriate behavior for level 2 functions.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1.
UC Approved: Language other than English (“e”)
Spanish 3 is intended for students who wish to move from the comfort of learned material to the challenging world of creating within the language. In this course students begin to adapt vocabulary to personal needs and to pursue their own interests in the language. The students’ repertoire of vocabulary and grammatical structures increases. Students also develop the ability to request and comprehend clarification, express and understand opinions, narrate and understand narration in various tenses, and identify, state, and understand various emotions. Students can use strings of related sentences when speaking, understand most spoken language delivered by a learned speaker, create simple paragraphs, and understand new information from various texts. Students become familiar with Spanish history, art, literature, music, current affairs, and civilization.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 2.
UC Approved: Language other than English (“e”)
Math 1 is the first of a sequence of three courses from Math 1, 2, and 3. The first half of the course focuses on functions, algebra, and the number system. It uses functions as models of real situations and spends most of the time on linear functions, linear equations, and linear equalities. The second half of the course is focused on Geometry: defining and constructing geometric constructs, using rigid motions to develop proofs of congruence and other geometric properties, and using geometric shapes to model natural objects. The second half also includes Statistics: student summarize, represent, and interpret various types of data.
The purpose of Math 1 is for students to develop basic understanding of functions, especially linear functions and equations and to work with geometric transformations to understand congruence and properties of geometric figures. This course also has students learn how to represent and interpret categorical and quantitative data and use the modeling process for algebraic and geometric models.
UC Approved: Mathematics (“c”)
Coordinate Geometry: Students will use coordinates to identify properties of lines and plane figures. Students will apply the Distance Formula, Pythagorean Theorem and Segment Slope Theorem to connect geometric properties to algebra. Students will also review and apply similar figures and transformations.
Quadratic Functions: Students will identify functions and parabolas in real-world context. Students will explore and manipulate quadratic functions.
Quadratic Equations: Students will solve quadratic equations through the development of the quadratic formula. Students will explore the relationship between quadratic functions and quadratic equations in this unit.
Pricing for Profit: Students will explore multiple types of models for real-world sales situations. Students will determine model dependence and independence in relation to other models. Students will identify key details such as profit, revenue, and cost. Students will create their own model for a hypothetical business, and make predictions using their model.
Similarity: Students will grasp geometric similarity using transformations. Students will also generate similarity based on dilation (reduction or enlargement of a shape). Students will prove figure congruency, using postulates.
Exponential Functions: Students will focus on exponential functions, where the variable is in the exponent. Both exponential growth, decay and geometric sequences are explored in this unit. Multiplicative Structure of exponential functions will also be explored in this section.
Probability: Students will use outcomes and sample space to express probability in a variety of situations. Students will also explore exclusivity and frequency tables.
Blind Spots: Three-dimensional shapes are analyzed by two-dimensional diagrams, to determine whether the viewing area of a camera, or a person’s line of vision is blocked. Students will experiment with changes to situations, in order to minimize blind spots. Students will also have an opportunity to choose a real location and design a security system that results in the smallest blind spot possible.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics I.
UC Approved: Mathematics (“c”)
Students will integrate and will apply the mathematics they have learned from their earlier courses. Math 3 includes standards from the conceptual categories of Number and Quantity, Algebra, Functions, Geometry, and Statistics and Probability.
For Mathematics 3, instruction time will: (1) apply methods from probability and statistics from data; (2) expand understanding of polynomial, rational, and radical functions; (3) expand right triangle trigonometry; and (4) consolidate functions and an analytical geometrical approach to create models and solve contextual problems. Students see how the visual displays and summary statistics they learned in earlier grades relate to different types of data and to probability distributions. They will identify different ways of collecting data.
Polynomials and the system of integers are developed. Students draw on analogies between polynomial arithmetic and base-ten computation, focusing on properties of operations, particularly the distributive property. Students connect multiplication of polynomials with multiplication of multidigit integers, and division of polynomials with long division of integers.
Students identify zeros of polynomials and make connections between zeros of polynomials and solutions of polynomial equations. Rational numbers extend the arithmetic of integers by allowing division by all numbers except zero. Similarly, rational expressions extend the arithmetic of polynomials by allowing division by all polynomials except the zero polynomial. A central theme of the Mathematics 3 course is that the arithmetic of rational expressions is governed by the same rules as the arithmetic of rational numbers. This critical area also includes exploration of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra.
Students will derive the Laws of Sines and the Law of Cosines in order to find missing measurements. They apply this knowledge to model simple periodic phenomena They will extend their work with exponential functions to include solving exponential equations with logarithms. The description of modeling as “the process of choosing and using mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, to understand them better, and to make decisions” is at the heart of this Mathematics 3 course.
Prerequisite: Completion of Mathematics 2 (or equivalent).
UC Approved: Mathematics (“c”)
This class will prepare students for math in the real world. Is designed for student who are not prepared for the mathematical rigor of math 3 or Calculus.  In this course students will learn about personal finance in the areas of credit, debt, money management, saving, and investing.  The students will develop critical thinking and problem solving strategies, and learn about the use of various technologies to aid in real world math situations.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math 1 (or equivalent) and Math 2 (or equivalent).
UC Approved: Mathematics (“c”)
Course will be presented with the same level of depth and rigor as are entry-level college and university pre-calculus courses. Course topics may include: Properties of Real Numbers; Linear and Quadratic Equations; System of Equations and Inequalities; Functions and Their Graphs; Rational Functions; Polynomials; Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Properties of Logarithms; Solve Logarithmic and Exponential Equations; Elementary and Advanced Analytic Trigonometry and Trigonometric Functions; Verify Trigonometric Identities; Solve Trigonometric Equations; Sum and Difference Formulas; Law of Sines; Law of Cosines; Vectors; Trigonometric Form of a Complex Number; DeMoivre’s Theorem; nth roost of Complex Numbers; Polar Equations; Matrices and Determinants; Sequences and Series; Conic Sections.
Prerequisite:Successful completion of Algebra 2 (or equivalent).
UC Approved: Mathematics (“c”)

Advanced Placement Calculus prepares students for the AP Calculus AB Exam. Students will study: (1) Functions, Graphs, and Limits (including analysis of graphs, limits of functions, asymptotic behavior, and continuity); (2) Derivatives (including the concept of the derivative, the derivative at a point and as a function, second derivatives, and applications of derivatives); and (3) Integrals (including interpretations and properties of definite integrals, applications of integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and antidifferentiation.
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and approval
UC Approved: Mathematics (“c”)
The topics for AP Statistics are divided into four major themes: exploratory analysis, planning and conducting a study, probability, and statistical inference.
Exploratory analysis of data makes use of graphical and numerical techniques to study patterns and departures from patterns. In examining distributions of data, students should be able to detect important characteristics, such as shape, location, variability and unusual values.
Data must be collected according to a well-developed plan if valid information is to be obtained. If data are to be collected to provide an answer to a question of interest, a careful plan must be developed.
Probability is the tool used for anticipating what the distribution of data should look like under a given model.
Statistical inference guides the selection of appropriate models. Models and data interact in statistical work: models are used to draw conclusions from data, while the data are allowed to criticize and even falsify the model through inferential and diagnostic methods. Models and data interact in statistical work: models are used to draw conclusions from data, while the data are allowed to criticize and even falsify the model through inferential and diagnostic methods.
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and approval
UC Approval: Mathematics (“c”)
Physical Education teaches the importance of a continuing program of physical activity in relationship to good health and recreation. Students are exposed to skills necessary to participate in various team, individual, and group activities. Students develop qualities of leadership, attain and preserve physical health, learn personal safety, learn to make use of leisure time, gain an understanding of people, and learn how to work cooperatively with others. This is provided in a setting which encourages positive Christian characteristics and behavior.
The purpose of the strength and conditioning p.e. class is to develop skills and habits of physical fitness that will help students maintain a healthy, fit and responsible lifestyle. Students will enhance their ability to work diligently and cooperatively with other students to meet goals. They will learn about the physiological basis for exercise. They will improve their muscular strength, power, flexibility and endurance to facilitate safe and successful participation in sports and other athletic activities. They will appreciate the complexity of the body that God has given them and understand its proper care and maintenance as “the temple” of God.
This discipline is intended as an introduction to science, specifically the physical sciences, for students who are not prepared for the mathematics necessary for Chemistry or Physics. The course will cover measurement and calculation techniques, the scientific method and scientific method, as well as introduce the main topics of Chemistry and Physics; specifically the atom, the periodic table, chemical nomenclature, balancing chemical equations, principles of motion, Newton’s laws of motion, simple machines, waves and electricity/magnetism.
Does not meet the criteria as a UC A-G laboratory science “d” course, but can be used toward fulfillment of the Fresno Christian 2 year science course requirement.
Biology is intended for students who need lab sciences for graduation, and/or college entrance. This class provides a broad survey of principles relating to the study of living things: biochemistry, genetics, genetic engineering, creation and evolution, ecology, taxonomy, botany, and zoology. Students gain understanding of how living things are studied, and what applications these studies have in day-to-day life. Emphasis is placed on lab experiences which give students opportunities to manipulate variables, observe plants and animals, and interact with technologies that are shaping medicine and agricultural practices world-wide.
UC Approved: Laboratory Science (“d”)
AP Biology is offered to students who desire advanced study in the life sciences and have previously completed introductory or honors Biology and Chemistry classes. AP Biology is a college-level biology course. Students cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based, hands-on laboratory investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes — energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions. The coursework follows published guidelines from the College Board and prepared students for a national exam in May.
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and approval
UC Approved: Laboratory Science (“d”)
This discipline covers atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding patterns, conservation of matter and energy, chemical calculations, gasses and their properties, acids and bases, solutions, reaction rates, thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, organic nomenclature, and nuclear processes. This course emphasizes the concepts behind processes of chemical change. Lab experiences are provided which demonstrate and reinforce the concepts. Respect for chemicals and safe chemical handling and lab practices are a primary consideration of student lab experiences.
UC Approved: Laboratory Science (“d”)
This discipline covers motion and forces with Newton’s Laws, conservation of energy and momentum, heat and thermodynamics, waves, and electric and magnetic phenomena. Lab experiences are provided which demonstrate and reinforce these concepts.
UC Approved: Laboratory Science (“d”)
Zoology is the study of animals. This course covers the Biology of the Animal Kingdom including structure, embryology, evolution, adaptations, ecology and physiology. Emphasis is hands-on through dissection and live-animal observation.
UC Approved: Laboratory Science (“d”)
One semester in 12th grade.
Civics integrates the American system of government and civic responsibility within the framework of Christian principles. This one-semester course addresses the topics of forms of government, basics of democracy, functions and history of political parties, history of suffrage, behavior of voters, the nominating process, elections, campaign financing, mass media, public opinion, the role of interest groups, local, state and federal legislation, and the judicial and executive branches. These topics are viewed historically, currently, and within other cultures. Previous and current court rulings are also examined in order to further explain political issues.
Students also have the opportunity to obtain hands-on experiences with an in-class mock trial, visitation to the Fresno County Superior Court-house, and involvement with a session of the Fresno City Council. The goal of the semester is for students to apply knowledge gained in class to their own Christian responsibility in society through participation in national and local government.
UC Approved: History (“a”)
One semester in 12th grade.
This course integrates the role of economics within government, business, and our personal lives. Principles are learned through a Christian worldview, emphasizing the usage of personal finances to further God’s purposes. This one-semester course addresses the topics of scarcity, opportunity costs, needs, wants, decision making, world economic systems, factors of production, supply, demand, prices, market structures, government involvement within economics, taxes, investments, student loans, credit, and personal budgeting. Students have the opportunity to have hands-on experiences with a stock market simulation and an entrepreneur project. The goal of the semester is for students to utilize classroom knowledge in their public and personal lives, discerning their own Christian responsibility in society.
UC Approved: College-Preparatory Elective (“g”)
World History integrates world history, culture, and historical movements with the goal of incorporating a Christian perspective on those events. Within the context of addressing the cause and effects of world history, this course also integrates knowledge of regional geography. Students address the issues of unresolved problems of the modern world and the interconnected relationship of the global community.
Students are taught the rise of democratic ideas from the Hebrews, Greeks, Romans, and British, and the strong influences from Reformation leaders Martin Luther and John Calvin. Ideas of the enlightenment through the American Revolution are surveyed. An examination of the French Revolution and its outcomes under the Napoleonic regime is compared and contrasted to the different outcomes of the American Revolution in its similar quest for liberty. The Industrial Revolution and its impact on politics, economics, and social attitudes are discussed.
In addition, the course covers the rise of imperialism and colonialism, its worldwide impact and influence on international tensions leading to World War I, and its consequences. Expressions of totalitarianism, specifically in Mussolini’s Italy, Nazi Germany, and the Stalinist Soviet Union are examined. The causes and events of World War II and its consequences leading to the Cold War Era are examined. The course concludes with teaching on nationalism in the contemporary world with specific attention given to the Israeli-Arab conflict, the Chinese civil war and its aftermath, and the fall of the Soviet Union.
UC Approved: History (“a”)
This course integrates the study of our nation’s past with the social, political, and economic influences and consequences of various time periods. The study of various multicultural issues in a pluralistic society are emphasized. During the year students are challenged to use critical thinking and analytical skills in the development of a biblically-centered worldview. How biblical principles influence the development of our nation are also integrated into the curriculum, while addressing the issues of our constitutional government, political process, and the foreign policies of various presidential administrations.
The course teaches students about the roots and advancement of democracy, the quest for social justice, the expansion of cities and industries, technological change, and the growth of the federal government. In addition, this course explores how individuals, ideas, religion, and geography have helped shape our nation over time and developed our distinct national character. Most importantly, this course is intended to further the student’s concept of American history in order to better understand the present and how history can help shape the future. Of primary emphasis is reviewing American history with a Christian worldview, observing history through the eyes of providence.
UC Approved: History (“a”)
AP US History is a challenging course that is designed to be the equivalent of a freshman college course in a high school setting. It is a year-long survey of American history from the age of exploration to the present. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed. Emphasis is placed on critical historical thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of original documents and historiography all within a biblical worldview.
You will be required to apply the effort necessary develop the ability to analyze historical evidence to determine its validity and relevance, identify point of view and the nature of bias, and recognize the necessity of objectivity and substantiation. The methodology of a historian involves skills that are highly transferable–the ability to formulate generalizations, interpret and use data and to analyze and weigh evidence from conflicting sources of information are applicable to many other academic and practical disciplines. Students will be readily prepared to take the AP Exam at the end of the academic year.
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and approval
UC Approved: History (“a”)
AP European History is a challenging college-level course that is structured around the investigation of five course themes and 19 key concepts in four different chronological periods from the Renaissance to the present. Besides covering the relevant historical facts from these eras and linking these facts to the analysis of the themes, the course requires you to master nine historical thinking skills. During the year, you will be provided with the opportunity to examine primary sources, such as documentary material, pictures and graphs, maps, political cartoons, statistical tables, and works of art. In addition, you will be provided with exposure to both factual narratives and to the interpretations of European history from the perspectives of a variety of different writers and historians. Historiography is the history of history. Students will be examining how people have thought about and written about historical events over the course of time. Students will also be provided with the opportunity to develop your analytical and interpretive writing skills, practicing short answer questions as well as document-based and long essay question essays. Besides the short answer questions, students will be writing at least one essay in each unit.
This course includes history as both content and methodology. Students must demonstrate knowledge of basic chronology and major events and trends since the High Renaissance, and will develop academic skills, including 1.) Effective analysis of such primary sources as documents, maps, statistics, art, pictures, and graphs; 2.) Effective note-taking; 3.) Clear and precise written expression; and 4.) The ability to weigh evidence and reach conclusions on the basis of fact.
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and approval
UC Approved: History (“a”)
This course focuses on the development of basic skills and necessary techniques used in drawing, painting, and a variety of art and craft forms along with developing the ability to critically evaluate their own work as well as those of the great masters. A brief history of art and various artists will also be investigated. Students will draw using graphite pencils, colored pencils, charcoal, and pen and ink with an emphasis on the elements and principles of design. In addition, students will learn the techniques of watercolor and tempera painting through actual experience with projects. Furthermore, students will explore different subjects each semester, which may include paper making, mosaics, rock painting, scratch board, origami, basket weaving, sculpture, mobiles, collage, and printmaking.
UC Approved: Visual and performing arts (“f”)
This class will focus on two and three dimensional art. Students will need to show a knowledge of the elements and principles of art as these basics will not be taught exclusively. It will be a faster moving class in which students will be using different material to create sculptures, drawings, and paintings. Students will also learn about specific artists during the Renaissance and 19th Century. The students will be exposed to sculptures, paintings, and architecture related to these periods. They will learn to critique art and will be expected to research and create a work of art based on a specific artist.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art 1 and teacher approval.
UC Approved: Visual and performing arts (“f”)

The students in this class will be creating an art portfolio throughout the year. This will include 12-20 pieces of art based on student preference. Guidelines will be provided so the student will have a finished portfolio by the end of the school year. These students will have more freedom in the class to pursue other projects during the year but would be expected to have a portfolio to pass the class.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art 2 and teacher approval.
UC Approved: Visual and performing arts (“f”)

Band is intended for students with previous instrumental experience interested in furthering their talents in a group setting. The class is designed as an intermediate instrumental group with the purpose of educating students through a variety of musical styles, while maintaining high standards of musicianship and musicality. Class activities emphasize the development of instrument technique, tone production, tuning, fundamentals of music theory, music history, music reading, and listening skills. Emphasis is also placed on the advancement of instrument technique, the further development of ensemble performance skills, and rehearsal and performance of intermediate level band music.
During the fall semester, the band will serve as the Pep Band at home football games and also participate in several local parades, including the Veteran’s Day Parade and the Clovis Electric Light Parade. During the Spring semester, the band participates in local and national festivals. In addition, the band performs in a Christmas Concert and Spring recital here at Fresno Christian. Students will play a wide variety of music, including, but not limited to: Pep, Patriotic, Sacred, Jazz, and Classical music. The central focus of this class is to use the God granted gift of music to return praise to Him.
*This class fulfills the PE requirement
UC Approved: Visual and performing arts (“f”)
Choir is intended for students with previous choral music experience interested in furthering their talents in a group setting. Its purpose is to educate students in choral music through many different sources of music, while maintaining high standards of musicianship and musicality.  A wide variety of music is sung, including classic choral literature of Bach, Mozart, and many other great composers, as well as modern choral compositions and pop and jazz songs.  This class educates students in music theory and musical interpretation, and focuses on using the God-granted gift of music to return praise to Him.  Students perform several times throughout the year, including at Christmas and in the spring, and participate in local and state choral festivals.
This course enables the student to develop interpretive skills.  Emphasis is on the process of “becoming” and communicating both verbally and nonverbally as the students use their voices and bodies.  Students learn how to train their talents, focus their attention, role play, interpret a scene, create a character, perform a scene or action improvisationally, and play for an audience, interpreting literature, plays, feelings, and actions. Participants are asked to escape from their own person and personality and enter into the thing being created.
Students are required to take part in productions presented throughout the year.  Some students, especially seniors and those who have taken the class previously, may work on individual and group theatrical projects.  Some students chosen by the instructor focus on crew duties such as stage manager work, set design, and make-up design.
UC Approved: Visual and performing arts (“f”)
Ensemble is intended for students who have shown excellence in choral music and who strive to perfect their gifts in a smaller ensemble setting.  The class is designed as an advanced choir with the purpose of educating students in choral music through many different sources of music, while maintaining the highest standards of musicianship and musicality.  A variety of music is performed, including classic choral literature of Bach, Mozart, and many other great composers, along with modern choral compositions, pop and jazz.  This class educates students in music theory and musical interpretation, to use the gift of music to return praise to God. Students perform many times throughout the year, at various competitions and festivals, along with home concerts.  The FCHS Ensemble acts as an ambassador for Fresno Christian Schools while singing in local churches and at other public events.
Prerequisite: Enrollment is based on audition.
This course is designed to help percussion students further their musical skills. Students will rehearse and perform with others. They will be taught music reading skills, musicality, music terminology, music history, and music theory. Students will receive training serving in marching band techniques and small percussion ensembles. Students will learn the concepts of rhythm, texture, balance, blend, and rudiments as they develop their role as ensemble members. Percussion students will work on music to be performed with the band, as well as music to be performed independently as a percussion ensemble.
During the first semester our primary focus will be on Marching.  Students will participate in several local parades, including the Veteran’s Day Parade and the Clovis Electric Light Parade. During the spring semester students will focus on concert music and percussion ensembles.
*This class fulfills the PE requirement
UC Approved: Visual and performing arts (“f”)
This course is designed for students to learn how to give an emotional context to social, political, environmental, and global issues through the use of photography in journalism. Partnered with Fresno Christian’s award winning  high school digital paper, (The Feather Online), photojournalist are trained as professionals in the publications world. Daily responsibilities require commitment and dedication to news deadlines, FCS events, and the feather team. Photojournalist capture imagery that is spread across many Fresno Christian platforms and utilized in marketing campaigns. The class focuses on photography skills, professional editing practices, journalistic captions, social media management, and digital design. Photojournalism teacher, Kori Friesen, has been a leading professional photographer and designer in the valley since 2005. Bringing business practice into a the small class environment allows for unique individualization that develops specific skill sets.
Prerequisite: Application and teacher approval.
UC Approved: Visual and performing arts (“f”)
Color Guard: The Color Guard/Winter Guard program at Fresno Christian School allows students the opportunity to learn performing concepts involved with flags, rifles, sabers and basic dance moves associated with a visual performance.  In the fall, this group will work in conjunction with the Eagle Marching and perform in several parades. Color Guard students will work on basic movement and equipment skills through fundamental studies and working on repertoire for marching and winter guard shows.
Color Guard students will learn basic aspects of performance observation and analysis. Color Guard students will design and choreograph their own production at least once during the school year. During the Spring semester, students will perform a choreographed show set to music as a Winter Guard. They will perform in local Guard competitions. During the spring semester, after school rehearsals will be held once a week. A 1 year commitment is required.
*This class fulfills the PE requirement

Home Economics/Life Skills: This year-long course teaches about the importance of personal and family living from a practical, biblical, problem-solving approach and teaching skills needed to function effectively within the family and a complex society.  Emphasis will be given to the development of life skills related to interpersonal communication in family and other relationships,  nutrition and food selection, cooking and meal planning, household and personal finances, introductory sewing and textile management, consumer awareness and strategies,  party planning, household management and personal wellness. Class limited to 15 students

Office Aide: This is an elective class where a student who has demonstrated responsibility has the opportunity to assist in one of the offices with clerical duties and other school related tasks. Credit is given on a pass/fail basis.
Prerequisite: Office staff approval.

Publications: This year-long course stresses the further development of outlining, writing skills, and editing, emphasizing clarity, brevity, conciseness, and organization of information. This is a “hands-on” lab and covers all areas of digital newspaper production. An online version of The Feather (thefeather.com) is published using WordPress, Word, and other digital mediums. Principles of scholastic journalism are modeled, taught and practiced daily.
Responsibility in preparing articles and meeting deadlines is central to the successful completion of the course. Staff will be expected to take on responsibilities much like a job but will be mentored each step of the way. As student completes each year in publications, expectations will be age appropriate. Ie: freshmen are given different articles and assignment than juniors and seniors. Upperclassmen will be required from time to time to complete assignments off campus with parental permission. A signed contract pertaining to participation and expectations is required for acceptance into this course.
The Feather is an award-winning nationally recognized online newspaper that is consistently is the top 10 in the United States. Join this team and let’s add to the legacy.
Prerequisite: Application and teacher approval.

Study Hall: A 7-12 Grade elective that provides a regularly scheduled class period for students to work on class assignments, homework, and do research. This elective is especially helpful to students involved in extracurricular activities and/or who need extra time to complete assignments, seek help from available teachers. Opportunity is also available for accessing computer workstations, homework supplies and equipment.

Teacher’s Aide: This is an elective class where a student who has demonstrated responsibility has the opportunity to assist a classroom teacher with duties related to their classroom. Credit is given on a pass/fail basis.
Prerequisite: Teacher approval.

HS Yearbook: This course is designed to develop students’ skills in yearbook by providing experiences in selected aspects of yearbook production.  Students learn basic principles of yearbook production and develop skills that include writing copy, captions and headlines; digital photography; desktop publishing and using appropriate technology tools for media production. Students will be responsible for working as a team and accomplishing goals laid out in the first week. Students are also responsible for consistently meeting deadlines.
UC Approved: College-Preparatory Elective (“g”)

Video Productions: Topics included in this course are familiarity with video equipment, basic digital video techniques, converting idea to image, the use of lighting, editing, and sound in video, and the roles of acting, directing, and good storytelling in the movie-making process. Critical and creative skills are developed; for example, students are primarily responsible for the production of class films for a school event. The use of video editing software such as Final Cut Pro, Soundtrack, Motion, and DVD Studio Pro is practiced. Infused into the entire course is an exploration of the development and influences of mass media. Students are asked to consider the role of faith in popular culture through a series of discussions, films, and assignments.